Australasian Darter Birds

I really enjoy walking at Birdsland Reserve, in Belgrave.  Always something to see, no matter the time of day. I’m usually there as the sun is rising and hits the lakes, roughly about 40mins after official sunrise. Lots of birdlife, beautiful lakes and bush life. Occasionally a kangaroo, haven’t yet seen an echidna yet. One day…

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Male darterbird in flight

Male darterbird with fish

Male darterbird

The Brolgas are dancing

Well, they aren’t really, but every time I hear the word it reminds me of the Christmas Carol, the Carol of the Birds. I learnt it in primary school and it has stuck with me all through my life.  The carol is written by John Wheeler and in the first verse it starts “Out on the plains the brolgas are dancing, Lifting their feet like warhorses prancing…”

I’ve never seen a Brolga dance but can imagine it.

From Wikipedia: The Brolga, formerly known as the Native Companion, is a bird in the crane family. It has also been given the name Australian Crane, a term coined in 1865 by well-known ornithological artist John Gould in his Birds of Australia. The Brolga is a common, gregarious wetland bird species of tropical and south-eastern Australia and New Guinea, It is a tall, upright bird with a small head, long beak, slender neck and long legs. The plumage is mainly grey, with black wing tips, and it has an orange-red band of colour on its head. It is well known for its intricate mating dance.

Brolga

Brolga

Brolga

Little fairies dancing on my lawn

Actually they were Superb Fairy-wrens (also known as Superior Fairy-wren). A whole family of them darting here and there, and enjoying the sunshine in the crisp cool air, a sunny winter’s morning.  Dad was around in his bright blue plumage but I couldn’t get him and two juniors were turning the blue colour too. However, these were the only co-operative ones that I could get shots of. Aren’t they cute?

Superior Fairy-wren

Superior Fairy-wren

Superior Fairy-wren

The two pelicans

Thought I’d share with you more shots I took the other day when I saw the two pelicans at Birdsland Reserve. They seemed to just glide through the water with very little movement – you could hardly tell they were moving for quite some time.

I was on the other side of the lake when I first noticed that a lady with her dog had stopped to watch these large birds on the lake.

Watching the pelicans

I moved as quickly as I could to the other side to get closer shots, without disturbing the birds.

A tale of two pelicans

A tale of two pelicans

A Tale of Two Pelicans

While at Birdsland Reserve earlier this week I saw, for the first time, two very large Pelicans gliding through the water. Absolutely gorgeous to watch. And then when they got to one section, one hopped up on a dead branch but the other pecked its tail to get it to move. The first jumped down and moved around the dead branches and the second jumped up rather clumsily to the same spot. Then the first found a new spot and together they groomed themselves. Seems even in the world of Pelicans there is a pecking order.

A Tale of Two Pelicans