Lorikeets in the Fig Tree

Our figs suddenly ripened a week ago. We were thinking they weren’t going to this year round. We’d had a long hot dry summer and we hadn’t watered the tree, or most of our garden, wanting to preserve our water as we live on tank water.  We got some rain, wind and sun in the space of a week and suddenly the figs ripened. And with that we had a sudden influx of birdlife, as well as bats at night. Below are Rainbow Lorikeets enjoying the fruits of our tree.

The Rainbow Lorikeet is a native of Australia and belong to the Parrot family.

I think this might be a young Lorikeet.
Rainbow Lorikeet

I caught this one unawares and it looked up with surprise.
Who me?

Enjoying his tucker!
Rainbow Lorikeet

Two young Lorikeets

The other day I heard a couple of Rainbow Lorikeets in our garden and went and tracked them down. I trod carefully as they’re usually flighty and take off really quickly. But these two were curious and stuck around. They were smaller than most I’d seen and I came to the conclusion they were youngsters. Are they beautiful colours? They were in my lilly pilly tree so it was hard to get clear shots without lots of branches and shadows in the way.

Rainbow lorikeet

Rainbow lorikeet

Aussie Birds Video Clip

Thought I’d share with you a clip that shows at my favourite bird forum. It shows some Australian birds, some well known, some not so. I know most of them and they show in this order:

Tawny Frogmouth chick, White Cockatoo, Willie Wagtail, Rainbow Lorikeet, Australian Laughing Kookaburra, Duck, Bush Turkey, unknown small bird, Black Raven, Red Browed Firetail.

Rainbow Lorikeet pays a visit

In line with my recent bird posts, this one is about the Rainbow Lorikeet.  We first saw them here our first summer, when the fig tree was in fruit (2010) but haven’t seen them since.  So I was delighted when last week I looked out my dining room window and there’s one in the liquidamber tree and it drops to the feeder and then the birdbath. As you can see, they are quite colourful all over, even on their belly.

I was surprised as they are fruit eaters and the feeder has parrot seed in it and not fruit.  However, in reading up on them it seems they also eat seeds, as well as nectar and flowers.  I was delighted to see our visitor.

The Rainbow Lorikeet is unmistakable with its bright red beak and colourful plumage. Both sexes look alike, with a blue (mauve) head and belly, green wings, tail and back, and an orange/yellow breast. They are often seen in loud and fast-moving flocks, or in communal roosts at dusk.

Rainbow lorikeet

Rainbow lorikeet

Rainbow lorikeet

Rainbow Lorikeets

The first thing I noticed when I entered the zoo pathway was the sound of excitable lorikeets and how they were flying from tree to tree.  The lorikeet is a species of parrot here in Australia and very colourful. They love fruit and nectar and can be seen in flowering gum trees and fruit trees in various parts of Australia. They fly around freely at the zoo but there are a couple in captivity in the Great Flight Aviary too. The closer shots at the bottom were taken in the aviary, the others of the ‘free’ birds flying around at the zoo.

Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus)

Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus)

Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus)

Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus)