The birds at Birdsland Reserve

It’s been colder, wet and windy, and I don’t get out to walk every day. I run a full time business and sometimes I have to go to morning meetings, or have a client visit. And if I don’t get out to walk in the morning it’s highly unlikely I’ll find time later in the day.  Which is frustrating when we do have nice days.

Recently I was there and decided to sit on one of the benches. I was rugged up to keep warm and had woollen gloves on too. Which meant having to remove one when I wanted to use my camera but it was worth the effort.

It was also worth sitting and waiting. I’d discovered a white faced grey heron only a couple of days before in another part of the reserve, not where there are walking paths and I couldn’t get close enough for a decent shot. As I left that morning I heard it calling and saw it winging its way over the main lake and off to the trees. And I had not been prepared! But this next time I heard it I was, and discovered there were two of them!

There are two in this shot if you look closely enough.
White faced heron

Wishing I had a 500mm lens for an even closer view – they were high up in the sky.
White faced heron

Another bird I’d seen several times but hadn’t been able to get a good shot of, finally gave me that opportunity the same week. The Brown Thornbill.
Brown Thornbill

Little fairies dancing on my lawn

Actually they were Superb Fairy-wrens (also known as Superior Fairy-wren). A whole family of them darting here and there, and enjoying the sunshine in the crisp cool air, a sunny winter’s morning.  Dad was around in his bright blue plumage but I couldn’t get him and two juniors were turning the blue colour too. However, these were the only co-operative ones that I could get shots of. Aren’t they cute?

Superior Fairy-wren

Superior Fairy-wren

Superior Fairy-wren

Two young Lorikeets

The other day I heard a couple of Rainbow Lorikeets in our garden and went and tracked them down. I trod carefully as they’re usually flighty and take off really quickly. But these two were curious and stuck around. They were smaller than most I’d seen and I came to the conclusion they were youngsters. Are they beautiful colours? They were in my lilly pilly tree so it was hard to get clear shots without lots of branches and shadows in the way.

Rainbow lorikeet

Rainbow lorikeet

More ducks at the wetlands

Below, in order are:
White-eyed Duck (Hardhead Aythya australis)
Chestnut Teal (Male)
Chestnut Teal (Female)
Dusky Moorhen, I loved how you could see its feet paddling under the water

White-eyed Duck (Hardhead Aythya australis)

Mallard Duck

Spotted Duck

Common Moorhen

Visit to the wetlands

I was attending a business meeting the other day at a cafe in Beaconsfield and learnt that there were wetlands really close to the shopping strip there. Sure enough, as I walked back to the car park I discovered the wetland was right behind the car park. Naturally I couldn’t resist paying a short visit before heading back home.

Below is a white-faced heron that I was able to get relatively close to before it flew off.  I was delighted to have that opportunity.

The Whitefaced Heron, Egretta novaehollandiae, is also known as the White-fronted Heron and is mostly light blue-grey in colour, with a characteristic white face. In flight, the dark flight feathers of the wing contrast with the paler grey plumage, making this bird easily identifiable when viewed from below. It has a long, slim neck and a pointed grey-black bill. The legs are long and dull yellow in colour.  These are the most commonly seen herons in Australia.

White-faced Heron (Ardeidae)

White-faced Heron (Ardeidae)

White-faced Heron (Ardeidae)